Saturday, May 16, 2020

Chinese and Weiqi (go) videos

A collection of videos for studying go and chinese together, for J1:

— Beginning level tutorial, this series is made almost 20 years ago, classic but outdated (https://www.bilibili.com/video/BV1ZW411h7Mf?from=search&seid=14516269619931393154)

— Beginning to mid-level life-death problems ( https://www.bilibili.com/video/BV1Rx411Y79F?p=1)

— Bad moves analysis (in Chinese literally translate to ‘smelly’ or ‘stinky’ moves) (https://www.bilibili.com/video/BV1cJ411w7bz?p=1)

 — Ancient complicated life-death problems from the 1700s, some are doable, some are so massive and even challenging for pros (https://www.bilibili.com/video/BV17x411x7hL?p=1)



  Ke Jie’s 15 best games voted by fans https://www.bilibili.com/video/BV1BW41177kC?p=1

— Pro game, commented by Ke Jie (https://www.bilibili.com/video/BV1kJ411x7bZ?p=1)

— AlphaGo VS AlphaGo 50 games (https://www.bilibili.com/video/BV1ob411e7DN?p=1)




— CCTV (China Central Televison) ‘s documentary about weiqi (https://www.bilibili.com/video/BV1s4411B7Np?from=search&seid=2724260708536054014)




Tuesday, February 11, 2020

What is 8?

I've had a chance to spend more time doing math with the kids again and am hoping to write up our activities more consistently.  Let's see how this works out!

Graham Fletcher created a set of  Progressions videos for various elementary school themes. J3 and I recently went back to his page and found he had a new(er than we knew) progression on early number and counting.  Even for this simple topic, the video highlights some points we hadn't considered explicitly, for example distinguishing producers (of a number) and counters. Also, the cardinality point that smaller natural numbers are nested within larger numbers wasn't something we had talked about, but we soon realized it was part of many examples in how we understand numbers.

With that as inspiration, J3 and I decided to search for a range of examples of a single number, we chose 8, in different forms.  There is at least one obvious version we're missing.

Add a comment (with picture, if you can) to show other forms of the number 8!

Marking 8 on the 100 board, an easy place to start:



8 beads on the abacus shows the relationships 3+5 = 8 and 10-2 = 8 (also 100- 92 = 8)

8 can hide in plain sight. Without labeling the three lengths, it would have been hard to recognize the longer one as 8 cm and, for you at home, impossible to know without reference to show the scale.


It happened that, within the precision of our scale, two chocolate wrapped chocolate bars were 8 oz (2x3.5 oz of chocolate + about half an ounce of wrapping for each):

8 cups of water ended up being a lot, so this version unintentionally revealed a relationship 4 + 2 + 2 = 8

Though I'm not sure I can articulate why or show supporting research, I feel it is very valuable to build experience with physical models of numbers to create familiarity and intuition about what they are/mean. In particular, I hope this helped J3 anchor the importance of units of measure and scale in the interpretation of numbers.

Finally, this construction has nothing to do with the number 8 (or does it???)